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Belle Grove

Belle Grove is an 18th-century grain and livestock farm, which, in its prime (circa 1815), encompassed about 7500 acres of land. The unique limestone house was completed in 1797 for Major Isaac Hite and his wife Nelly, sister of future President James Madison. The house has remained virtually unchanged through the years, offering visitors an experience of the life and times of the people who lived there in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
ID Number : 19022
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Claude Moore Colonial Farm

Welcome to Claude Moore Colonial Farm at Turkey Run! This living history site demonstrates the life of a poor farm family living on a small farm in northern Virginia just prior to the American Revolutionary War. Staff and volunteers dressed in reproduction period clothes, work the farm, and answer your questions about the farm, livestock, and family, as if you were actually an 18th century visitor.
ID Number : 17835
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Colvin Run Mil

Fairfax County's only operational 19th century water powered gristmill. Colvin Run Mill Historic Site was acquired in 1972 by the Fairfax County Park Authority for the preservation of Colvin Run Mill and its associated historic buildings, and for the enjoyment and education of visitors.
ID Number : 17839
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George Washington's Mount Vernon

Mount Vernon was home to George Washington for over 45 years. Here he made his life with his wife Martha, returned from war, retired from public life, practiced pioneering farming methods, and left an indelible stamp of his personality and private tastes. Today, over 1 million people a year visit the estate to find the essence of the man known as the "Father of His Country."Mount Vernon was home to George Washington for over 45 years. Here he made his life with his wife Martha, returned from war, retired from public life, practiced pioneering farming methods, and left an indelible stamp of his personality and private tastes. Today, over 1 million people a year visit the estate to find the essence of the man known as the "Father of His Country."
ID Number : 19023
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Peirce Mill on Rock Creek

Peirce Mill was built in the 1820's, and operated commercially until 1897. The United States Government acquired the mill as part of Rock Creek Park in 1892. From 1904 to 1934, the structure was leased to various individuals and organizations as a teahouse. The National Park Service acquired stewardship of the site in 1933 and restored it as a working mill in 1936.
ID Number : 17840
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Stonewall Jackson House

The Stonewall Jackson House at 8 East Washington Street in Lexington, Virginia is the only home that the famous Confederate General Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson ever owned. Jackson and his wife, Mary Anna Morrison, lived in the house while he taught at the Virginia Military Institute before the Civil War. The house, a Registered National Landmark, is owned and operated by the Stonewall Jackson Foundation.
ID Number : 19028
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The National Colonial Farm

While many historical museums focus on the lifestyles of prosperous farmers, it is equally important to understand how a typical family of the late colonial period would have lived. The National Colonial Farm, an outdoor living history museum, was established by the Accokeek Foundation in 1958 to educate people about life on a middle-class tobacco farm of 1775. Skilled interpreters lead tours of the National Colonial Farm, highlighting the colonial structures, fields, gardens and animals.
ID Number : 17833
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 1  The Society of the Cincinnati - Anderson House

Anderson House, a National Historic Landmark, is a Beaux-Arts mansion that was completed in 1905 as the winter residence of Ambassador Larz Anderson III and his wife, Isabel Weld Perkins. Plan your visit to come tour this historic mansion.
Show Details | Visit Page | ID Number : 23806
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